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2010 suits trends

2010 suits trends

Men’s suits, a trend? Admittedly they’ve never really been out of style, but there have been times where they haven’t been cool. But as young gents take to the streets wearing the suit stylings of their grandfathers, including everything from three piece suits to bow ties, it’s time to brush up on the styles and cuts of suits that are in for Fall 2010. Click to read more on men’s suits for 2010.

While suiting and formal-wear trends for men aren’t seasonal (unless, of course, you’re talking about the weight of the cloth) and play out over several years, 2010 and 2011 continue the change in men’s suiting that rose to the fore in recent years. For the foreseeable future the trend in men’s suiting revolves around the classics, but more specifically modern takes on the classics. A good suit for this decade will take the best elements from the peak eras of men’s suiting (think the formality of the Victorian era, the savoir faire of the 1930s and the skinny detailing of the 1960s) and apply them to a modern silhouette.

So what elements should you look for?

The Cut of the Suit

In men’s suiting there’s a move away from the ‘skinny boy’ suit, but that’s not to say slim is out altogether nor that a boxy cut has replaced it. Instead, think of a cut that takes would appeal to a military officer, one that accents a sense of the masculine through three key silhouette elements:

  1. broad shoulders
  2. a slim waist
  3. slim trousers

As for the individual cuts?

Double Breasted Suits and Sportscoats

tom ford suit
Double breasted Tom Ford suits from Tom Ford Spring / Summer 2010 collection

If there’s one cut that I’m glad I’ve been able to return to my wardrobe for this decade it’s the modern, double-breasted suit. Those of you old enough to remember the last time the double breasted suit or sports coat was in (the 1980s through to the mid 1990s) may remember the boxy cut it inevitably came with. Fear not, that cut is gone (and if you’re still sitting on double breasted suiting from that era, take it off to the tailors to refresh its life). In its place is a cut that pairs broad shouldered with a slim waist, a cut that defies what double breasted suits were originally designed to do: hide a plump figure. Instead their now designed to accent and to heighten the perfect masculine shape: the V-shaped, well worked body.

One additional styling tip: when selecting a double-breasted suit look for the “Kent” cut. Named after a style popularised by the The Prince George, Duke of Kent, it’s a cut of double breasted suits where a longer lapel line extends into the waist. That is to say: the part of the double breasted suit that sits on the front buttons on the waist line (as picture on the Duke of Windsor, right). This small detail will convey height and, if cut correctly, a slimmer waist. You’ll find the Kent suit cut amongst a number of collections, including D&G Fall 2010 (pictured below).

d&g suit
Double breasted Kent cut D&G suits D&G men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Neo-Double Breasted Suit

marc jacobs suit

Neo double breasted suit from Marc Jacobs men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Three-Piece Suits

Let’s face it: the waistcoat has long been a dead item for most men, but thanks to a resurgence in its popularity in men’s street wear the suits’ waistcoat is back with vengeance. Well, not quite vengeance but it’s back, it’s subtle and it’s classic. And that means that in 2009 we’ll witness the return of the three-piece suit, and I couldn’t be more happy. That’s because the three-piece suit has been one of the most under-utilised parts of a man’s wardrobe over the last forty years.

The three-piece in 2009 is all about cohesion; forget the mismatching style prevalent in the early parts of the 20th Century and in the 1980s. The return of the three-piece means that the waistcoat has to be conservative and, thus, in the same fabric as the suit’s other two pieces. If you do want to venture outside the realm of three matching pieces, stick to a similar colour palette and avoid any pattern except for stripes; you may want to pair a pinstripe black suit with a pinstripe charcoal waistcoat.

On selecting the perfect three-piece suit I’d recommend looking for a waistcoat whose V shape breaks somewhere between the sternum and the base of the rib cage. I’ve seen three pieces from the likes of Giorgio Armani which don’t sport the V shape and finish just under the collar, these are going to be a lot harder to wear and ignore the conservative subtlety this revival depends upon. Moreover, such a large waistcoat won’t convey a slim waist as effectively as one with a deeper neck.

Jude Law

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While suiting and formal-wear trends for men aren’t seasonal (unless, of course, you’re talking about the weight of the cloth) and play out over several years, 2010 and 2011 continue the change in men’s suiting that rose to the fore in recent years. For the foreseeable future the trend in men’s suiting revolves around the classics, but more specifically modern takes on the classics. A good suit for this decade will take the best elements from the peak eras of men’s suiting (think the formality of the Victorian era, the savoir faire of the 1930s and the skinny detailing of the 1960s) and apply them to a modern silhouette.

So what elements should you look for?

The Cut of the Suit

In men’s suiting there’s a move away from the ‘skinny boy’ suit, but that’s not to say slim is out altogether nor that a boxy cut has replaced it. Instead, think of a cut that takes would appeal to a military officer, one that accents a sense of the masculine through three key silhouette elements:

  1. broad shoulders
  2. a slim waist
  3. slim trousers

As for the individual cuts?

Double Breasted Suits and Sportscoats

tom ford suit
Double breasted Tom Ford suits from Tom Ford Spring / Summer 2010 collection

If there’s one cut that I’m glad I’ve been able to return to my wardrobe for this decade it’s the modern, double-breasted suit. Those of you old enough to remember the last time the double breasted suit or sports coat was in (the 1980s through to the mid 1990s) may remember the boxy cut it inevitably came with. Fear not, that cut is gone (and if you’re still sitting on double breasted suiting from that era, take it off to the tailors to refresh its life). In its place is a cut that pairs broad shouldered with a slim waist, a cut that defies what double breasted suits were originally designed to do: hide a plump figure. Instead their now designed to accent and to heighten the perfect masculine shape: the V-shaped, well worked body.

One additional styling tip: when selecting a double-breasted suit look for the “Kent” cut. Named after a style popularised by the The Prince George, Duke of Kent, it’s a cut of double breasted suits where a longer lapel line extends into the waist. That is to say: the part of the double breasted suit that sits on the front buttons on the waist line (as picture on the Duke of Windsor, right). This small detail will convey height and, if cut correctly, a slimmer waist. You’ll find the Kent suit cut amongst a number of collections, including D&G Fall 2010 (pictured below).

d&g suit
Double breasted Kent cut D&G suits D&G men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Neo-Double Breasted Suit

marc jacobs suit
Neo double breasted suit from Marc Jacobs men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Three-Piece Suits

Let’s face it: the waistcoat has long been a dead item for most men, but thanks to a resurgence in its popularity in men’s street wear the suits’ waistcoat is back with vengeance. Well, not quite vengeance but it’s back, it’s subtle and it’s classic. And that means that in 2009 we’ll witness the return of the three-piece suit, and I couldn’t be more happy. That’s because the three-piece suit has been one of the most under-utilised parts of a man’s wardrobe over the last forty years.

The three-piece in 2009 is all about cohesion; forget the mismatching style prevalent in the early parts of the 20th Century and in the 1980s. The return of the three-piece means that the waistcoat has to be conservative and, thus, in the same fabric as the suit’s other two pieces. If you do want to venture outside the realm of three matching pieces, stick to a similar colour palette and avoid any pattern except for stripes; you may want to pair a pinstripe black suit with a pinstripe charcoal waistcoat.

On selecting the perfect three-piece suit I’d recommend looking for a waistcoat whose V shape breaks somewhere between the sternum and the base of the rib cage. I’ve seen three pieces from the likes of Giorgio Armani which don’t sport the V shape and finish just under the collar, these are going to be a lot harder to wear and ignore the conservative subtlety this revival depends upon. Moreover, such a large waistcoat won’t convey a slim waist as effectively as one with a deeper neck.

China Piano Player – Lang Lang

China Piano Player – Lang Lang

Lang Lang was born June 14, 1982 in Shenyang, Liaoning, China is a concert pianist China Hong Kong citizenship.

Performing and recording career

Lang Lang has sold out recitals and concerts in many cities and is the first Chinese pianist employed by the Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic and the orchestras of the United States.

A Chicago Tribune music critic called it “the biggest, most exciting young keyboard talent I found in the many who attended the piano recital.”

Lang Lang has gathered praise from kritikus musisi and around the world – the conductor Jahja Ling said, “Lang Lang is special because of his total mastery of the piano … He has talent and great communicative strength” National Public Radio.

This is often recorded. that Lang lang successful mengangkangi both worlds – classic magic and rock-like “superstar”, the phenomenon is summarized by the Times reporter Emma Pomfret, who wrote, “I can not find the other classic artists that have achieved broad appeal without dumbing down Lang Lang”

Lang Lang performance has been criticized. His performance style has been referred to as a “wet heavy rhythm and expression.” and as “really boring”, “just bad” and “intolerable.”

Critics who feel that the game is more vulgar and lack of sensitivity has given the title “Bang Bang”. Pianist Earl Wild have called it “J. Lo piano.”

Has describe him as an adult, even praising its ability to “capture young people with courage.”

On the other hand, has resulted in a similar fashion to the performance described as a “speed burning and power boom … Lang daredevil tendencies find outlet gratifying” Some critics think that Lang is in the best playing classical repertoire as compared with the Romantic composer Chopin.

However, growth in recent years has also been recorded in the.

The New Yorker: “The spirit of Lang Lang maturity as an artist.

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Men’s brooches

Men’s brooches

By now you should see the overall trend for menswear in Autumn / Fall 2010 emerging: refinement. And what way to embellish that refinement than with the right detailing, specifically men’s brooches. What’s best is just how versatile a men’s brooch can be as an accessory: wearable on everything from suits to jackets, the range of styles available means you can make them work with any look be it something dandy or something dark. Read more on men’s brooches, including a number of street style updates.

There aren’t all that many fashion accessories for men when one considers the sheer volume that exist for women. And of those that do exist, quite often you find that they’re heavily associated with a sub-culture or movement that you’re simply not interested in associating yourself with. Brooches for men are, however, one of the few men’s accessories which can cross the sub-culture divides, are perfect for both Spring/Summer and Autumn (Fall)/Winter seasons, and are slowly making a come-back.

The Styles
As if taking their cues from the Cool Britannia revival, the most popular of men’s brooches take their cues from vintage Anglo-Saxon, English and Scottish brooches, and old-world motifs such as stag heads.

Where To Buy
The men’s brooches from the above picture, courtesy of Brandish, are available from the likes of Urweg, Yoox, BBlessing and Cooper-Hewitt. You can also do some hunting for the men’s brooches from Gucci’s Autumn (Fall)/Winter 2008 collection, which have easily been amongst the best to hit the catwalks.

Personally I’m a fan of brooches of the vintage kind; for which you can turn to both vintage stores and eBay.

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