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Men’s military fashion trend 2010

Men’s military fashion trend 2010

Military remains in fashion for both men and women in Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010. But just as this trend has changed for women, so too has it evolved for men. And in exactly the same way. Taking more inspiration from early 20th Century military conflicts, the look takes in both army and air force motifs, with nautical trailing a distant third (that’s relegated more to a preppy trend). Read up on the men’s military clothing trend including details on key looks, pieces and compatible trends.

For King and Country

The men’s military fashion trend is nothing new to us. Revived in 2008/2009 as part of a larger 1980s revival it had, to date, the flamboyant style popularised by the likes of Adam Ant. Not so for Autumn (Fall) / 2010. Ant, in turn, had taken his inspiration from a time when the European superpowers were at their peak, and military uniforms were less about functionality and more about how grand your country was.

The 1980s fashion revival is, however, on the wane. A new decade calls for a new swatch, and the focus on subtlety and quality that I hope will shape the next decade of men’s fashion will see the men’s military trend evolve in 2010 to be far more articulate.

So if the inspiration no longer comes from the 1980s, then when? The Second World War. An era of rationing, clean cuts, functionality, and, of course, the dapper gentleman off to fight for King and Country.

Key Pieces

If you intend to indulge in the 2010 / 2011 interpretation of the men’s military fashion trend there are two key pieces you’ll need:

  1. A greatcoat. Colour choices here sit strongest with Army green and Navy / Air Force navy hues. The greatcoat can be single or double-breasted, and should be detailed with brass buttons. For genuine authenticity, find some antique buttons on eBay and pull out a needle and thread, or simply purchase a vintage piece and have the cut altered accordingly. Further, the greatcoat can be belted or unbelted: it needs only to have a fitted waist.
  2. Aviator boots with shearling

It’s worth nothing that shearling can also be applied to the collar of a greatcoat or an aviator jacket, particularly if you’re trending towards the fighter ace look. Be cautious about moving into the realm of costuming however: being on trend doesn’t translate to looking like you’re off to a fancy dress party dressed as the Red Baron.

Other Trends To Wear It With

One of the great things about this trend is that it is made to be functional; after all, it comes from a era when people could frequently be heard to say “there’s a war on!” Thus the trend can be worn with many a toned down piece, particularly darker colours. As an example, in the trouser department look for solid coloured pants or darker denim. For a touch of flair, look for shiny trousers.

For greatest effect be sure to turn to either of the key 2010 men’s hairstyles: the classic part or the fringe. While the fringe adds a very youthful quality to the look, I’d recommend choosing between the two based solely on what suits your facial shape and hair.

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Beyond the Brain

Beyond the Brain

The ancient Egyptians thought so little of brain matter they made a practice of scooping it out through the nose of a dead leader before packing the skull with cloth before burial.

They believed consciousness resided in the heart, a view shared by Aristotle and a legacy of medieval thinkers.

Even when consensus for the locus of thought moved northward into the head, it was not the brain that was believed to be the sine qua non, but the empty spaces within it, called ventricles, where ephemeral spirits swirled about.

As late as 1662, philosopher Henry More scoffed that the brain showed “no more capacity for thought than a cake of suet, or a bowl of curds.”

Around the same time, French philosopher René Descartes codified the separation of conscious thought from the physical flesh of the brain.

Cartesian “dualism” exerted a powerful influence over Western science for centuries, and while dismissed by most neuroscientists today, still feeds the popular belief in mind as a magical, transcendent quality.

A contemporary of Descartes named Thomas Willis—often referred to as the father of neurology—was the first to suggest that not only was the brain itself the locus of the mind, but that different parts of the brain give rise to specific cognitive functions.

Early 19th-century phrenologists pushed this notion in a quaint direction, proposing that personality proclivities could be deduced by feeling the bumps on a person’s skull, which were caused by the brain “pushing out” in places where it was particularly well developed.

Plaster casts of the heads of executed criminals were examined and compared to a reference head to determine whether any particular protuberances could be reliably associated with criminal behavior.

Though absurdly unscientific even for its time, phrenology was remarkably prescient—up to a point. In the past decade especially, advanced technologies for capturing a snapshot of the brain in action have confirmed that discrete functions occur in specific locations.

The neural “address” where you remember a phone number, for instance, is different from the one where you remember a face, and recalling a famous face involves different circuits than remembering your best friend’s.

Yet it is increasingly clear that cognitive functions cannot be pinned to spots on the brain like towns on a map.

A given mental task may involve a complicated web of circuits, which interact in varying degrees with others throughout the brain—not like the parts in a machine, but like the instruments in a symphony orchestra combining their tenor, volume, and resonance to create a particular musical effect.