Tag Archives: modern

2010 suits trends

2010 suits trends

Men’s suits, a trend? Admittedly they’ve never really been out of style, but there have been times where they haven’t been cool. But as young gents take to the streets wearing the suit stylings of their grandfathers, including everything from three piece suits to bow ties, it’s time to brush up on the styles and cuts of suits that are in for Fall 2010. Click to read more on men’s suits for 2010.

While suiting and formal-wear trends for men aren’t seasonal (unless, of course, you’re talking about the weight of the cloth) and play out over several years, 2010 and 2011 continue the change in men’s suiting that rose to the fore in recent years. For the foreseeable future the trend in men’s suiting revolves around the classics, but more specifically modern takes on the classics. A good suit for this decade will take the best elements from the peak eras of men’s suiting (think the formality of the Victorian era, the savoir faire of the 1930s and the skinny detailing of the 1960s) and apply them to a modern silhouette.

So what elements should you look for?

The Cut of the Suit

In men’s suiting there’s a move away from the ‘skinny boy’ suit, but that’s not to say slim is out altogether nor that a boxy cut has replaced it. Instead, think of a cut that takes would appeal to a military officer, one that accents a sense of the masculine through three key silhouette elements:

  1. broad shoulders
  2. a slim waist
  3. slim trousers

As for the individual cuts?

Double Breasted Suits and Sportscoats

tom ford suit
Double breasted Tom Ford suits from Tom Ford Spring / Summer 2010 collection

If there’s one cut that I’m glad I’ve been able to return to my wardrobe for this decade it’s the modern, double-breasted suit. Those of you old enough to remember the last time the double breasted suit or sports coat was in (the 1980s through to the mid 1990s) may remember the boxy cut it inevitably came with. Fear not, that cut is gone (and if you’re still sitting on double breasted suiting from that era, take it off to the tailors to refresh its life). In its place is a cut that pairs broad shouldered with a slim waist, a cut that defies what double breasted suits were originally designed to do: hide a plump figure. Instead their now designed to accent and to heighten the perfect masculine shape: the V-shaped, well worked body.

One additional styling tip: when selecting a double-breasted suit look for the “Kent” cut. Named after a style popularised by the The Prince George, Duke of Kent, it’s a cut of double breasted suits where a longer lapel line extends into the waist. That is to say: the part of the double breasted suit that sits on the front buttons on the waist line (as picture on the Duke of Windsor, right). This small detail will convey height and, if cut correctly, a slimmer waist. You’ll find the Kent suit cut amongst a number of collections, including D&G Fall 2010 (pictured below).

d&g suit
Double breasted Kent cut D&G suits D&G men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Neo-Double Breasted Suit

marc jacobs suit

Neo double breasted suit from Marc Jacobs men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Three-Piece Suits

Let’s face it: the waistcoat has long been a dead item for most men, but thanks to a resurgence in its popularity in men’s street wear the suits’ waistcoat is back with vengeance. Well, not quite vengeance but it’s back, it’s subtle and it’s classic. And that means that in 2009 we’ll witness the return of the three-piece suit, and I couldn’t be more happy. That’s because the three-piece suit has been one of the most under-utilised parts of a man’s wardrobe over the last forty years.

The three-piece in 2009 is all about cohesion; forget the mismatching style prevalent in the early parts of the 20th Century and in the 1980s. The return of the three-piece means that the waistcoat has to be conservative and, thus, in the same fabric as the suit’s other two pieces. If you do want to venture outside the realm of three matching pieces, stick to a similar colour palette and avoid any pattern except for stripes; you may want to pair a pinstripe black suit with a pinstripe charcoal waistcoat.

On selecting the perfect three-piece suit I’d recommend looking for a waistcoat whose V shape breaks somewhere between the sternum and the base of the rib cage. I’ve seen three pieces from the likes of Giorgio Armani which don’t sport the V shape and finish just under the collar, these are going to be a lot harder to wear and ignore the conservative subtlety this revival depends upon. Moreover, such a large waistcoat won’t convey a slim waist as effectively as one with a deeper neck.

Jude Law

Men’s suits, trend, Admittedly, of style, times, cool, young, gents, streets, wearing, suit, styling, grandfathers,  bow ties, , brush styles, suiting, formal-wear, trends, seasonal, men’s suiting, rose, fore, foreseeable, future, classics, specifically, modern, classics, elements, peak, eras Victorian, era,  savoir, faire, skinny,  silhouette, man wear, menwear, man cloth, man tshirt, menshirt, tie, cap, heat, scarf, pans, slack, jacket, sandle

While suiting and formal-wear trends for men aren’t seasonal (unless, of course, you’re talking about the weight of the cloth) and play out over several years, 2010 and 2011 continue the change in men’s suiting that rose to the fore in recent years. For the foreseeable future the trend in men’s suiting revolves around the classics, but more specifically modern takes on the classics. A good suit for this decade will take the best elements from the peak eras of men’s suiting (think the formality of the Victorian era, the savoir faire of the 1930s and the skinny detailing of the 1960s) and apply them to a modern silhouette.

So what elements should you look for?

The Cut of the Suit

In men’s suiting there’s a move away from the ‘skinny boy’ suit, but that’s not to say slim is out altogether nor that a boxy cut has replaced it. Instead, think of a cut that takes would appeal to a military officer, one that accents a sense of the masculine through three key silhouette elements:

  1. broad shoulders
  2. a slim waist
  3. slim trousers

As for the individual cuts?

Double Breasted Suits and Sportscoats

tom ford suit
Double breasted Tom Ford suits from Tom Ford Spring / Summer 2010 collection

If there’s one cut that I’m glad I’ve been able to return to my wardrobe for this decade it’s the modern, double-breasted suit. Those of you old enough to remember the last time the double breasted suit or sports coat was in (the 1980s through to the mid 1990s) may remember the boxy cut it inevitably came with. Fear not, that cut is gone (and if you’re still sitting on double breasted suiting from that era, take it off to the tailors to refresh its life). In its place is a cut that pairs broad shouldered with a slim waist, a cut that defies what double breasted suits were originally designed to do: hide a plump figure. Instead their now designed to accent and to heighten the perfect masculine shape: the V-shaped, well worked body.

One additional styling tip: when selecting a double-breasted suit look for the “Kent” cut. Named after a style popularised by the The Prince George, Duke of Kent, it’s a cut of double breasted suits where a longer lapel line extends into the waist. That is to say: the part of the double breasted suit that sits on the front buttons on the waist line (as picture on the Duke of Windsor, right). This small detail will convey height and, if cut correctly, a slimmer waist. You’ll find the Kent suit cut amongst a number of collections, including D&G Fall 2010 (pictured below).

d&g suit
Double breasted Kent cut D&G suits D&G men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Neo-Double Breasted Suit

marc jacobs suit
Neo double breasted suit from Marc Jacobs men’s Autumn (Fall) / Winter 2010 / 2011

Three-Piece Suits

Let’s face it: the waistcoat has long been a dead item for most men, but thanks to a resurgence in its popularity in men’s street wear the suits’ waistcoat is back with vengeance. Well, not quite vengeance but it’s back, it’s subtle and it’s classic. And that means that in 2009 we’ll witness the return of the three-piece suit, and I couldn’t be more happy. That’s because the three-piece suit has been one of the most under-utilised parts of a man’s wardrobe over the last forty years.

The three-piece in 2009 is all about cohesion; forget the mismatching style prevalent in the early parts of the 20th Century and in the 1980s. The return of the three-piece means that the waistcoat has to be conservative and, thus, in the same fabric as the suit’s other two pieces. If you do want to venture outside the realm of three matching pieces, stick to a similar colour palette and avoid any pattern except for stripes; you may want to pair a pinstripe black suit with a pinstripe charcoal waistcoat.

On selecting the perfect three-piece suit I’d recommend looking for a waistcoat whose V shape breaks somewhere between the sternum and the base of the rib cage. I’ve seen three pieces from the likes of Giorgio Armani which don’t sport the V shape and finish just under the collar, these are going to be a lot harder to wear and ignore the conservative subtlety this revival depends upon. Moreover, such a large waistcoat won’t convey a slim waist as effectively as one with a deeper neck.

Porsche 911 GT2

The wildest, fastest 911 around – rear-engined, rear wheel drive and 523bhp of turbocharged silliness. See why they call it the widowmaker? We’d still take the GT3 instead though. We think

Comfort 
For something that’ll keep pace with a Ferrari 430 Scud on just about any road, it’s not half bad even over dodgy road surfaces. That said, it’s not exactly what you’d call a comfortable car to drive. And then there’s always the lurking suspicion that it Actually Wants To Kill You.

ComfortFor something that’ll keep pace with a Ferrari 430 Scud on just about any road, it’s not half bad even over dodgy road surfaces. That said, it’s not exactly what you’d call a comfortable car to drive. And then there’s always the lurking suspicion that it Actually Wants To Kill You.

Performance

Jaw-dropping. A reworked version of the Turbo’s 3.6-litre sees a frankly insane 523bhp and 502lb ft of torque. That’s good for 0-62 in 3.6 seconds, 0-100mph in 7.4 seconds and a top speed on the scary side of 200mph. In a drag race, it’ll eat the Nissan GT-R for breakfast. And then come back for elevenses.

Cool

Instantly marks you out as a tosser. But the sort of tosser who’s happy to die in hideous and immediate fashion. Which, we think you’ll agree, is the most likeable sort of tosser

Quality

Although the interior touch points are not what they were on the air-cooled cars, the modern 911 is still beautifully built and able to rack up ridiculous mileage without showing a trace of wear and tear

Handling

Possibly the greatest steering of any modern car. Even with the traction control off, you know exactly what the back end is doing. At least, you do right up until the moment that it punts you into a hedge.


Practicality

The 911 is an icon of impracticality; the car the divorcee buys when he no longer has the kids to worry about. There’s a roll cage behind the front seats. What more do you need to know?

Running costs

It’ll cost you £130 grand to buy, the equivalent of a semi-detached house to insure each year, and no matter how desirable the GT2 is, it’ll still hit you hard come resale time. But the guys at Porsche say they’ve worked hard on making the GT2 as economical as possible, which is nice to know.

Top 8 Men’s Cardigans

Top 8 Men’s Cardigans

Cardigans are another wardrobe must have. And they have had a bit of a comeback lately too, not that they ever really went out of style but more and more designers seem to have them in their collections. Cardigans are great if you aren’t a sport jacket kind of guy or if you are feeling more casual. They are perfect for transitional weather like in spring. They come in so many styles from slim fitting and modern to more traditional.

Public Opinion V-Neck Cotton & Cashmere Cardigan

There is nothing like the feel of cashmere. And when mixed with cotton, it’s equally as soft but much less expensive. This cardigan has a modern cut with a few modern touches like the contrast trim and elbow patches.

Gap Zip-Front Mock-Neck Cardigan

I love this cardigan. It’s simple, casual and acts like a jacket with it’s kangaroo pockets and zip front.

Marc by Marc Jacobs Merino Wool Cardigan

This is the type cardigan that both you or your dad could wear. It’s just a matter of how you wear it. I love the color. What a great cardigan to wear with jeans. Although it’s a bit of a splurge, it’s the kind of piece that you would could wear year round.

Marc Ecko Argyle Zip Cardigan

If you are fan of argyle patterns, then you may like this cardigan. It’s definitely more interesting than your average cardigan.

Banana Republic Silk/cotton/cashmere cardigan

This cardigan is definitely versatile and so soft. You could wear this with jeans and a tee or with dress pants and a button-down shirt. I am a big fan of Banana Republic for bringing us designer looks for less.

Elizabeth and James Baja Cardigan

This eye catching cardigan is a great alternative to a jacket. It’s made of cotton and merino wool, so you know you will nice and cozy on chilly days. It’s has a relaxed fit with split kangaroo pockets and a hood. This is the kind of piece you don’t mind spending a little money on since you will get many compliments.

Public Opinion Slash Stripe Cardigan

This button up cardigan looks way more expensive than it is. It could easily be a piece from a designer collection. It comes in two color combinations, but the black with blue stripe is my personal favorite.

American Rag Striped Cardigan

This is a classic sweater but with modern details such as contrast cuffs and hem. It’s made of a cotton and has a skull print on the inside of the cardigan.

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